Author Topic: Has the Internet Made You Cluelessly Modify Your Motorcycle For The Worst?  (Read 229 times)

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james.mc

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On Adventure Rider Radio in This Episode a guy from Honda Canada Research & Development discusses the development process of Honda bikes and highlights Honda's engineering ethos.
Standard EOM parts have a lot going for them and might be worth extra consideration before clicking on the 'buy now' button at your favourite online accessories shop!
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James Mc
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Current: 2008 Triumph Tiger 1050
Previous: 2003 Honda Varadero XL1000V (bought 2003, sold 2013 - Sadly left behind in Europe)

MrKiwi

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Hmmmm, the great OEM versus aftermarket parts debate.

There is no doubt OEM parts come with better quality and reliability but there are times when their functionality is not what you might be looking for. For example, the OEM rear rack on the Africa Twin meets their specifications but it doesn't perform the way I want it to. Therefore an after market part is the best option.

Horses for courses I say.


And it is interesting that Distributors and Dealers will fit after market parts to, especially things like exhausts.
MrKiwi
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james.mc

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The manufacturer would have you believe that they got it right in all aspects, where as in reality they can only cater to mainstream buyers which, in the bulk of cases with many of Honda Adventure Tourers, might never see much off road in their lifetime.

Plus, people like to personalise.  If they want to put progressive fork springs on the bike then so be it.  I have to say that with my XL1000V I rode it for about 2 years with standard OEM suspension before swapping the front and rear springs out.  The Honda guy in the audio recording recommended that people don't modify their bike until they have ridden it for a good few thousand KM's, otherwise they don't know what the improvement is if they modify it right away.  It could potentially be a retrograde step but they'll never know.  So he had a point.

After I swapped my springs for progressive units I instantly wished changed the springs out a lot sooner. The next 8 years were perfect for me in the suspension department (on the bike I mean ;) )

I guess a manufacturer will never suit all tastes because many of us have different needs.

« Last Edit: July 24, 2017, 08:16:15 by james.mc »
regards
James Mc
Honda-Adventure-Riders

Current: 2017 CRF1000L DCT
Current: 2008 Triumph Tiger 1050
Previous: 2003 Honda Varadero XL1000V (bought 2003, sold 2013 - Sadly left behind in Europe)

MrKiwi

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That's for sure.


The rear suspension has been swapped out of my AT for Ohlins and the difference is significant. But then I knew when buying the bike I might need to do that given how I want to use it.
MrKiwi
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Two Plugs

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Not clueless. Much easier I would say...  ;D
Founder of VIM, that's why I am in!

Jyrays

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I have now almost 22k on odo. I have added luggage, protection but have not changed original bike... except the hand guards  VCIF_ThumbUp

So far it works as expected, but I think it needs suspension update sooner or later.
Current: HONDA CRF1000L Tricolor DCT
Honda NC700X DCT
Past: Honda VFR 1200 X Crosstourer / Honda SLR 650 / HONDA XLV 1000 Varadero / Honda XR 650 R / KTM 640 LC4 / Honda CB1100 / Yamaha XJ 850 / Honda CB 500 1977...